The G-15 Lens

To me the G-15 lens is is a very classic and safe choice of color for sunglasses – Especially if you’re getting prescription sunglasses. The green-grayish color is soft on the eyes and looks very good in both metal and acetate frames.

In 1951 Bausch & Lomb invented the N-15 lens for the Navy Air Corps. The N-15 was later altered to be more suitable for prescription use.

The human eye responds more to green and yellow light than blues and reds. The G-15 lens emphasizes the wavelengths our eyes are most sensitive to and blocks the other colors. This gives you a natural vision without distorting the colors – it’s easier on the eyes.

The original G-15 lens is of mineral glass and blocks 85% of the light, which means it’s a dark lens since only 15% light gets through to your eyes. And of course the lens has 100% UV-protection.

Different lens manufacturers have different names for the G-15 color. Zeiss names it Pioneer, Essilor calls it . But Bausch & Lomb was first to call it G-15.

Photo from here.

SUNGLASS WEEK – Classics

The Classics are a great investment and will look good for many occasions and for many years. If taken good care of, a classic sunframe may be passed down to the next generation. If you find one of these in your parent’s drawers, take great care of it.

These classics have been inspiration for many many sunglasses and still going strong.


Randolph Engineering Aviator, an American classic seen on Don Draper in Mad Men


Ray-Ban Aviator in Arista Gold and G-15 Lens


Ray-Ban Caravan in Arista Gold and G-15 Lens


Persol 649 in Dark Tortoise and G-15 Lens, read more about Persol and this particular frame here.


Ray-Ban Wayfarer in Dark Tortoise and G-15 Lens

Moscot Lemtosh in Tortoise and Calibar Green Lens

Classic Persol

Persol is a very classic Italian eyewear brand founded in 1917 and several of their glasses feature the characteristic metal arrow hinges. The name is derived from “per il sole”, Italian for “for the sun”. If you find a pair of vintage Persol it says “Ratti” inside the temple and the quality is wonderful. In 1995 Luxottica took over the production of Persol.

One of Persol’s most important figures is definitely  Steve McQueen, who wore Persol 714 with blue lenses in the “Thomas Crown Affair” in 1968 (See picture below). Additional fun fact: the custom pair Steve McQueen wore in the movie was auctioned for $60.000! Steve McQueen also wore another very similar Persol frame called 649 in his every day life.

thomas-crown-affair-rolls-royce
Steve McQueen wearing the Persol 714 with blue lenses in “The Thomas Crown Affair”. Photo from here.


Steve McQueen in Persol. Photo from here.


Marcello Mastroianni in “Divorce Italian Style” wearing the Persol 649. Photo from here.

Persol’s 649 (see picture below) looks exactly like 714 but is not foldable. The 649 was made in 1957 for tram drivers in Turin who needed large glasses to protect their eyes from dust and air. It was made famous in 1961 by Marcello Mastroianni who wore a black pair in “Divorce Italian Style” (See picture above). We really like the 649 in tortoise and green-gray lenses also known as G-15 lenses. Very classic frames, you can rarely go wrong when buying this one.

Persol sunglasses were James Bond’s only choice a few times, both Daniel Craig and Pirece Brosnan wore them as Bond. We could keep namedropping celebrities who’ve worn Persol but we think this is enough for now.